When will Boris Johnson announce the roadmap to end lockdown and what might be in it?

Boris Johnson is preparing to announce his "roadmap" out of England's lockdown that has been in place since Jan 5.  Despite the determination to keep the details under wraps, The Telegraph has been told that the roadmap will be divided into at least four “steps” or phases, spaced roughly a month apart and running until at least the end of June. A number of easements have already been signed off, including full reopening of schools, a limited resumption of care home visits indoors, socialising with one other person outdoors and the later mixing of two households in parks. Here is a look at how it might pan out. When will the announcement be made?  The Prime Minister will reveal the plan on Monday, Feb 22. He will address MPs shortly after 3pm and, four hours later, the nation in a press conference from Downing Street. How is the Government approaching the easing of restrictions? Mr Johnson said his roadmap would include dates "if we possibly can", explaining they will likely be target dates "by which we hope we can do something at the earliest".   The Prime Minister's comments follow demands from backbench Tories for greater clarity, as Mr Johnson said the roadmap would be "cautious but irreversible". However, he stressed that coronavirus rates would need to be "really, really low" before restrictions could be eased. Lockdown is unlikely to be eased significantly until daily Covid cases are in the hundreds, compared with more than 10,000 a day now, The Telegraph understands. Insiders have stressed that as part of the “cautious approach” to reopening, sufficient time is needed between each easement to assess the impact on infections. Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, said the Government "absolutely" wanted the current lockdown to be the last. What will reopen first? From Mar 8, it is expected schools will reopen fully, despite widespread resistance from nine of the country’s teaching unions, who have called for a staggered return for secondaries. While schools argue the requirement to test all pupils when they first return makes the timeframe logistically difficult, a Government source said: “The ambition has always been to make sure all kids go back at the same time.” The Telegraph can disclose that parents will be asked to test their secondary school children when they return to school, should plans be finalised between the Department for Education and union bosses. Parents will be provided with lateral flow tests to carry out the tests twice a week, with every pupil being tested upon return to school, which is expected to be staggered by some year groups.  Read more: How can schools successfully reopen? What the UK can learn from other countries How is the rest of the roadmap looking? Sources have signalled that the second phase will begin around the same time in April, with non-essential retail among the sectors due to reopen. But, The Telegraph understands, social distancing rules that say people should keep two metres apart when outside are likely to remain in place for "months". Reports have suggested various reopening dates for hospitality, with optimistic suggestions varying from Easter weekend to May, with the caveat that the initial reopening may be for outdoors rather than indoors. In a recent letter to Mr Johnson, the chief executive of the pub giant Young's, Patrick Dardis, said: "There is no reason why pubs cannot open in April, giving people back their liberty and their much-loved pub." But Dr Bharat Pankhania, senior clinical lecturer at the University of Exeter medical school, said talking about pubs reopening in April was "premature" and pub bosses needed to realise there was a danger of going "back to square one". Read more: Lockdown timeline: How Boris Johnson's roadmap to lifting restrictions might look What about holidays? Downing St said the Government was doing "everything we can to make sure people can have a holiday this summer" but Mr Johnson and other ministers have repeatedly cautioned that it is too early to be certain about what people will be able to do regarding holidays. However, Mr Johnson announced that every person aged over 18 will have been offered a coronavirus vaccination by the end of July, raising hopes of foreign holidays by August. The Save Future Travel Coalition, made up of 12 leading travel trade organisations, has said it is vital that the Government works with the industry to develop a roadmap to reopen travel. The industry argues that a risk-based approach to travel, including a coordinated approach to vaccine certificates and use of passenger testing, will be critical in opening up the overseas travel market.  It comes as research by the all party group on the future of aviation found that the UK economy will lose £18 billion if the current restrictions on international travel extend into the Summer. Read more:  The underrated British cities you must discover in 2021 ​ When will be able to see family again? Two different households

When will Boris Johnson announce the roadmap to end lockdown and what might be in it?

Boris Johnson is preparing to announce his "roadmap" out of England's lockdown that has been in place since Jan 5. 

Despite the determination to keep the details under wraps, The Telegraph has been told that the roadmap will be divided into at least four “steps” or phases, spaced roughly a month apart and running until at least the end of June.

A number of easements have already been signed off, including full reopening of schools, a limited resumption of care home visits indoors, socialising with one other person outdoors and the later mixing of two households in parks.

Here is a look at how it might pan out.

When will the announcement be made? 

The Prime Minister will reveal the plan on Monday, Feb 22.

He will address MPs shortly after 3pm and, four hours later, the nation in a press conference from Downing Street.

How is the Government approaching the easing of restrictions?

Mr Johnson said his roadmap would include dates "if we possibly can", explaining they will likely be target dates "by which we hope we can do something at the earliest".  

The Prime Minister's comments follow demands from backbench Tories for greater clarity, as Mr Johnson said the roadmap would be "cautious but irreversible". However, he stressed that coronavirus rates would need to be "really, really low" before restrictions could be eased.

Lockdown is unlikely to be eased significantly until daily Covid cases are in the hundreds, compared with more than 10,000 a day now, The Telegraph understands.

Insiders have stressed that as part of the “cautious approach” to reopening, sufficient time is needed between each easement to assess the impact on infections.

Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, said the Government "absolutely" wanted the current lockdown to be the last.

What will reopen first?

From Mar 8, it is expected schools will reopen fully, despite widespread resistance from nine of the country’s teaching unions, who have called for a staggered return for secondaries.

While schools argue the requirement to test all pupils when they first return makes the timeframe logistically difficult, a Government source said: “The ambition has always been to make sure all kids go back at the same time.”

The Telegraph can disclose that parents will be asked to test their secondary school children when they return to school, should plans be finalised between the Department for Education and union bosses.

Parents will be provided with lateral flow tests to carry out the tests twice a week, with every pupil being tested upon return to school, which is expected to be staggered by some year groups. 

Read more: How can schools successfully reopen? What the UK can learn from other countries

How is the rest of the roadmap looking?

Sources have signalled that the second phase will begin around the same time in April, with non-essential retail among the sectors due to reopen.

But, The Telegraph understands, social distancing rules that say people should keep two metres apart when outside are likely to remain in place for "months".

Reports have suggested various reopening dates for hospitality, with optimistic suggestions varying from Easter weekend to May, with the caveat that the initial reopening may be for outdoors rather than indoors.

In a recent letter to Mr Johnson, the chief executive of the pub giant Young's, Patrick Dardis, said: "There is no reason why pubs cannot open in April, giving people back their liberty and their much-loved pub."

But Dr Bharat Pankhania, senior clinical lecturer at the University of Exeter medical school, said talking about pubs reopening in April was "premature" and pub bosses needed to realise there was a danger of going "back to square one".

Read more: Lockdown timeline: How Boris Johnson's roadmap to lifting restrictions might look

What about holidays?

Downing St said the Government was doing "everything we can to make sure people can have a holiday this summer" but Mr Johnson and other ministers have repeatedly cautioned that it is too early to be certain about what people will be able to do regarding holidays.

However, Mr Johnson announced that every person aged over 18 will have been offered a coronavirus vaccination by the end of July, raising hopes of foreign holidays by August.

The Save Future Travel Coalition, made up of 12 leading travel trade organisations, has said it is vital that the Government works with the industry to develop a roadmap to reopen travel.

The industry argues that a risk-based approach to travel, including a coordinated approach to vaccine certificates and use of passenger testing, will be critical in opening up the overseas travel market. 

It comes as research by the all party group on the future of aviation found that the UK economy will lose £18 billion if the current restrictions on international travel extend into the Summer.

Read more:  The underrated British cities you must discover in 2021 ​

When will be able to see family again?

Two different households could be allowed to meet outside by Easter – allowing groups of relatives to finally catch up in gardens or parks – thanks to the lifting of rules that stop two household groups from gathering outdoors.

Relatives who live far away from each other may have to wait a little longer, however, because it is unclear when guidance telling people to remain in their local areas will be lifted.

From March 8, there may also be changes to the care home visit rules, with each resident allowed to name one person to become a regular indoor visitor.