Thursday morning UK news briefing: Teachers will decide exam grades

If you want to receive twice-daily briefings like this by email, sign up to the Front Page newsletter here. For two-minute audio updates, try The Briefing - on podcasts, smart speakers and WhatsApp. Fears over repeat of last year's school grading chaos End-of-year exams will be voluntary. The Department for Education will announce the move today amid warnings of another summer of chaos and record grade inflation. Exam boards will prepare a series of test papers for every subject - but teachers will be allowed to choose whether or not to use them to inform pupils' predicted grades, which will be used to dictate overall results. Even if test papers are used, students will not need to take them under exam conditions and teachers will decide if they are completed at home or at school. Appeals will be open to all. Education Editor Camilla Turner has everything we know about this year's grading system for A-levels and GCSEs, which will be announced by Education Secretary Gavin Williamson today in the Commons. Ministers were warned students faced a "free for all" situation, in which grade inflation could be so rampant as to render results meaningless. It came as it emerged that children are not under any obligation to wear face masks, with the Government telling schools not to send pupils home if they refuse to wear one. It is an issue that has led to widespread concerns from parents, pupils and teachers. This is the guidance. And, as ever, Matt has a funny take on the topic for today's cartoon. Education Secretary Gavin Williamson will announce his plan today Credit: Blower Can Tiger Woods complete another sport comeback? Tiger Woods has less than a 50 per cent chance of playing professional golf again after shattering his right leg in a US car crash. That is the expert opinion of one of Britain's leading orthopaedic specialists, whose comments will intensify concern throughout the golf world. As details emerged of the mysterious accident in Los Angeles, attention inevitably turned to what is next for the sporting icon. Woods previously completed one of sport's greatest comebacks. Can he do it again? The world's best players and his close friends feature in our long-read on whether the golf star can make a new career resurgence. How to watch Harry and Meghan's Oprah interview The BBC will not be "pulling out its chequebook" for Oprah Winfrey's tell-all interview with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Meghan is understood to have wanted the highly anticipated interview to be broadcast on Britain's main channel. But with the corporation ruling itself out, ITV emerged as the front-runner to win the UK rights. The 90-minute special - the couple's first sit-down interview since they were engaged in November 2017 - is expected to attract huge viewing figures. At a glance: More coronavirus headlines Also in the news: Today's other headlines Class change | The BBC is to set targets for the proportion of working class employees, following accusations the broadcaster lacks diversity of thought. As part of this year's workplace census, staff have been asked to declare whether they attended private school, if they were eligible for free school meals and what their parents did for a living. Anita Singh reports it will be the first time that socio-economic quotas have been set.   Around the world: Painting the town red A supporter of the Nepal Communist Party gets her face painted prior to a celebration rally one day after the Supreme Court ordered the reinstatement of parliament in Kathmandu, Nepal. The lower house of the parliament was dissolved by Prime Minister KP Sharma Oli in December last year. View more striking world pictures of the day. A face paint artist at work in Kathmandu Credit: NARENDRA SHRESTHA/EPA-EFE Comment and analysis You've got this: Getting you through lockdown 'My locks were butchered into a buzz cut' | What a man learns when his wife cuts his hair The trouble with staying up late | A night owl's guide to becoming a morning person Fitness | Tess Daly on yoga, body confidence and inspiration from Sir Bruce Forsyth Business and money briefing Square Mile | The Governor of the Bank of England has warned Brussels against plotting a protectionist power grab with tough new laws of "dubious legality" aimed at stealing business from the City. Andrew Bailey said the EU could seek to seize part of London's prized derivatives clearing market in a "controversial" legal effort that Britain must resist.   Sport briefing Cricket | Joe Root, Stuart Broad and James Anderson could all face disciplinary action for angrily confronting the umpires on a disastrous day for England in Ahmedabad. The tourists' hopes of a rare series win in India were already in tatters after they were skittled for 112 in their first innings. But England were most infuriated by the third umpire. Simon Heffer writes that England's shocking petulance must be stamped out.   Tonight's dinner Linguine with mussels, saffro

Thursday morning UK news briefing: Teachers will decide exam grades

If you want to receive twice-daily briefings like this by email, sign up to the Front Page newsletter here. For two-minute audio updates, try The Briefing - on podcasts, smart speakers and WhatsApp.

Fears over repeat of last year's school grading chaos

End-of-year exams will be voluntary. The Department for Education will announce the move today amid warnings of another summer of chaos and record grade inflation. Exam boards will prepare a series of test papers for every subject - but teachers will be allowed to choose whether or not to use them to inform pupils' predicted grades, which will be used to dictate overall results. Even if test papers are used, students will not need to take them under exam conditions and teachers will decide if they are completed at home or at school. Appeals will be open to all. Education Editor Camilla Turner has everything we know about this year's grading system for A-levels and GCSEs, which will be announced by Education Secretary Gavin Williamson today in the Commons. Ministers were warned students faced a "free for all" situation, in which grade inflation could be so rampant as to render results meaningless.

It came as it emerged that children are not under any obligation to wear face masks, with the Government telling schools not to send pupils home if they refuse to wear one. It is an issue that has led to widespread concerns from parents, pupils and teachers. This is the guidance. And, as ever, Matt has a funny take on the topic for today's cartoon.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson will announce his plan today Credit: Blower

Can Tiger Woods complete another sport comeback?

Tiger Woods has less than a 50 per cent chance of playing professional golf again after shattering his right leg in a US car crash. That is the expert opinion of one of Britain's leading orthopaedic specialists, whose comments will intensify concern throughout the golf world. As details emerged of the mysterious accident in Los Angeles, attention inevitably turned to what is next for the sporting icon. Woods previously completed one of sport's greatest comebacks. Can he do it again? The world's best players and his close friends feature in our long-read on whether the golf star can make a new career resurgence.

How to watch Harry and Meghan's Oprah interview

The BBC will not be "pulling out its chequebook" for Oprah Winfrey's tell-all interview with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Meghan is understood to have wanted the highly anticipated interview to be broadcast on Britain's main channel. But with the corporation ruling itself out, ITV emerged as the front-runner to win the UK rights. The 90-minute special - the couple's first sit-down interview since they were engaged in November 2017 - is expected to attract huge viewing figures.

At a glance: More coronavirus headlines

Also in the news: Today's other headlines

Class change | The BBC is to set targets for the proportion of working class employees, following accusations the broadcaster lacks diversity of thought. As part of this year's workplace census, staff have been asked to declare whether they attended private school, if they were eligible for free school meals and what their parents did for a living. Anita Singh reports it will be the first time that socio-economic quotas have been set.  

Around the world: Painting the town red

A supporter of the Nepal Communist Party gets her face painted prior to a celebration rally one day after the Supreme Court ordered the reinstatement of parliament in Kathmandu, Nepal. The lower house of the parliament was dissolved by Prime Minister KP Sharma Oli in December last year. View more striking world pictures of the day.

A face paint artist at work in Kathmandu Credit: NARENDRA SHRESTHA/EPA-EFE

Comment and analysis

You've got this: Getting you through lockdown

  1. 'My locks were butchered into a buzz cut' | What a man learns when his wife cuts his hair
  2. The trouble with staying up late A night owl's guide to becoming a morning person
  3. Fitness | Tess Daly on yoga, body confidence and inspiration from Sir Bruce Forsyth

Business and money briefing

Square Mile | The Governor of the Bank of England has warned Brussels against plotting a protectionist power grab with tough new laws of "dubious legality" aimed at stealing business from the City. Andrew Bailey said the EU could seek to seize part of London's prized derivatives clearing market in a "controversial" legal effort that Britain must resist.  

Sport briefing

Cricket | Joe Root, Stuart Broad and James Anderson could all face disciplinary action for angrily confronting the umpires on a disastrous day for England in Ahmedabad. The tourists' hopes of a rare series win in India were already in tatters after they were skittled for 112 in their first innings. But England were most infuriated by the third umpire. Simon Heffer writes that England's shocking petulance must be stamped out.  

Tonight's dinner

Linguine with mussels, saffron and cream | Bring some of the mystery of mussels to this pasta dish by Diana HenryView the recipe and try our Cookbook newsletter.

And finally... for this morning's downtime

Beauty speakeasies | From £1,500 haircuts to doorway Botox, it seems many more Britons are breaking lockdown to keep up appearances with treatments still off the menu until April 12. Beauty Director Sonia Haria goes inside the world of backstreet beauty.