The World Bank should not fund Ethiopia’s war in Tigray

Protesters supporting Tigray gather outside the UN in New York. As Ethiopia seeks international support, organisations cannot shirk their obligation to acknowledge its political realities © Getty Images This month, Ethiopia, a low-income country facing economic difficulties, is making its case for a financial bailout at the spring meetings of the World Bank and IMF. It is also conducting a war of starvation in the northern Tigray region. Week by week soldiers are destroying everything essential to sustain life — food and farms, clinics and hospitals, water supplies. How should the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development treat a government engaged in widespread and systematic destruction and impoverishment, not to mention killing and rape? Bank staff don’t like to make political judgments, but in this case the directors — representing the shareholders including the US and UK — cannot shirk their obligation to acknowledge the political realities in Ethiopia. Read More from FT Previous articleEthiopia: war in Tigray threatens to end Abiy’s dream of unity Next articleLiya Kebede & Her Daughter Bring A Touch Of Ethiopia’s Artisanship To H&M

The World Bank should not fund Ethiopia’s war in Tigray
Protesters supporting Tigray gather outside the UN in New York. As Ethiopia seeks international support, organisations cannot shirk their obligation to acknowledge its political realities © Getty Images

This month, Ethiopia, a low-income country facing economic difficulties, is making its case for a financial bailout at the spring meetings of the World Bank and IMF.

It is also conducting a war of starvation in the northern Tigray region. Week by week soldiers are destroying everything essential to sustain life — food and farms, clinics and hospitals, water supplies.

How should the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development treat a government engaged in widespread and systematic destruction and impoverishment, not to mention killing and rape? Bank staff don’t like to make political judgments, but in this case the directors — representing the shareholders including the US and UK — cannot shirk their obligation to acknowledge the political realities in Ethiopia.

Read More from FT