The priority list for the Pfizer vaccine - and how it will be rolled out

The largest-scale vaccination programme in British history will begin on Tuesday, December 8, as the first doses of the Covid-19 jab are handed out, being described as a "decisive turning point in the battle against coronavirus" by NHS England chief executive Sir Simon Stevens. The first batch of Pfizer/BioNtech jabs will be given to NHS workers, care home residents and the over-80s from this week. However, the Business Secretary, Alok Sharma, has said the "bulk" of the vaccine rollout would take place in 2021, with the Oxford/AstraZeneca version likely to boost the supply considerably. Vaccinations will take place in NHS Trusts across England, with a full list of the 53 locations available here. Jabs will also commence across Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, where a complete list of hospitals is yet to be announced. NHS England has warned GP surgeries they must be ready to administer 975 doses to priority patients within three-and-a-half days after they receive the vaccine on December 14. In total, the UK has ordered 40 million doses of the vaccine, which is enough to vaccinate 20 million people. The NHS announced this morning that Britain would receive up to four million doses of the Pfizer vaccine before the end of 2020. These claims come after new concerns that a majority of the public would miss out during the first vaccination wave because of limited supplies.   Read more: The hospitals that will have the Covid-19 vaccine, and how it will be rolled out Who will receive the vaccine first? The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has recommended that the vaccine should be prioritised for the elderly and health workers. Explaining the priorities for who will get the vaccine, chairman of the JCVI Professor Wei Shen Lim said: "Vaccines are offered to protect people who are most at risk from dying of Covid-19, as well as to protect health and social care services, because by doing so we also protect lives." Professor Lim said age was the single most important factor in the estimated risk of mortality, and everyone in the country older than 50 will be vaccinated by the time the end of phase one. The Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Professor Van-Tam, suggested the priority list for vaccinations will cover 99 per cent of Covid-related deaths, meaning restrictions may then begin to come to an end.  The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has also prioritised key workers in the queue for immunisation. Therefore, transport workers, first responders and teachers will be among the first to receive the jab in the second phase of the vaccine rollout.  Three modes of delivery Mr Hancock said there would be "three modes of delivery" of the vaccine, with hospitals, mass vaccination centres and GPs and pharmacists offering the jab to those most in need. The NHS has been preparing for a mass vaccination programme for several weeks and could have up to 1,500 GP practices, and drive-through centres ordered to open from 8 am to 8 pm every day, each dispensing at least 1,000 jabs a week. Under the current plans, local clusters of about five practices covering approximately 50,000 patients, known as Primary Care Networks, will combine to organise vaccine delivery and the health service is hoping to immunise one million people per week. However, any potential rollout will be limited by the speed of manufacture in Belgium, with plans to distribute "as rapidly as the company can manufacture". The Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Professor Van-Tam, has also announced the rollout would take "months, not weeks", meaning it is essential to continue following the new tier system rules.  Professor Van-Tam said: "Nobody wants lockdown. But if you want that dream to come true as quickly as it can come true, then you have to take the vaccine when it is offered to you." The Armed Forces and NHS have begun urgent preparations for the centres have been told they should be completed within a fortnight, according to sources.  53 NHS Trusts have been chosen to administer the first batch of the Pfizer vaccine. These trusts are in areas which are currently under Tier 2 and Tier 3 restrictions, which includes cities such as Liverpool, Sheffield and Nottingham.  Here is the list of the NHS Trusts which will roll-out the vaccines from December 8: Blackpool Teaching Hospitals Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals Cambridge University Hospitals Chesterfield Royal Hospital Countess of Chester Hospital Croydon University Hospital Dartford and Gravesham Hospitals Dorset County Hospitals East and North Hertfordshire Hospitals East Kent Hospitals East Suffolk and North Essex Hospitals Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust Gloucestershire Hospitals Great Western Hospitals Guys & St Thomas NHS Trust James Paget University Hospitals Kings College Hospital Princess Royal University Hospital, Kings Lancashire Teaching Hospital Leeds Teaching Hospital Leicester Partnership NHS Trust Liverpool University Hospital

The priority list for the Pfizer vaccine - and how it will be rolled out

The largest-scale vaccination programme in British history will begin on Tuesday, December 8, as the first doses of the Covid-19 jab are handed out, being described as a "decisive turning point in the battle against coronavirus" by NHS England chief executive Sir Simon Stevens.

The first batch of Pfizer/BioNtech jabs will be given to NHS workers, care home residents and the over-80s from this week. However, the Business Secretary, Alok Sharma, has said the "bulk" of the vaccine rollout would take place in 2021, with the Oxford/AstraZeneca version likely to boost the supply considerably.

Vaccinations will take place in NHS Trusts across England, with a full list of the 53 locations available here. Jabs will also commence across Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland, where a complete list of hospitals is yet to be announced.

NHS England has warned GP surgeries they must be ready to administer 975 doses to priority patients within three-and-a-half days after they receive the vaccine on December 14.

In total, the UK has ordered 40 million doses of the vaccine, which is enough to vaccinate 20 million people. The NHS announced this morning that Britain would receive up to four million doses of the Pfizer vaccine before the end of 2020. These claims come after new concerns that a majority of the public would miss out during the first vaccination wave because of limited supplies.  

Read more: The hospitals that will have the Covid-19 vaccine, and how it will be rolled out

Who will receive the vaccine first?

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has recommended that the vaccine should be prioritised for the elderly and health workers.

Explaining the priorities for who will get the vaccine, chairman of the JCVI Professor Wei Shen Lim said: "Vaccines are offered to protect people who are most at risk from dying of Covid-19, as well as to protect health and social care services, because by doing so we also protect lives."

Professor Lim said age was the single most important factor in the estimated risk of mortality, and everyone in the country older than 50 will be vaccinated by the time the end of phase one.

The Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Professor Van-Tam, suggested the priority list for vaccinations will cover 99 per cent of Covid-related deaths, meaning restrictions may then begin to come to an end. 

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has also prioritised key workers in the queue for immunisation. Therefore, transport workers, first responders and teachers will be among the first to receive the jab in the second phase of the vaccine rollout. 

Three modes of delivery

Mr Hancock said there would be "three modes of delivery" of the vaccine, with hospitals, mass vaccination centres and GPs and pharmacists offering the jab to those most in need.

The NHS has been preparing for a mass vaccination programme for several weeks and could have up to 1,500 GP practices, and drive-through centres ordered to open from 8 am to 8 pm every day, each dispensing at least 1,000 jabs a week.

Under the current plans, local clusters of about five practices covering approximately 50,000 patients, known as Primary Care Networks, will combine to organise vaccine delivery and the health service is hoping to immunise one million people per week.

However, any potential rollout will be limited by the speed of manufacture in Belgium, with plans to distribute "as rapidly as the company can manufacture".

The Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Professor Van-Tam, has also announced the rollout would take "months, not weeks", meaning it is essential to continue following the new tier system rules. 

Professor Van-Tam said: "Nobody wants lockdown. But if you want that dream to come true as quickly as it can come true, then you have to take the vaccine when it is offered to you."

The Armed Forces and NHS have begun urgent preparations for the centres have been told they should be completed within a fortnight, according to sources. 

53 NHS Trusts have been chosen to administer the first batch of the Pfizer vaccine. These trusts are in areas which are currently under Tier 2 and Tier 3 restrictions, which includes cities such as Liverpool, Sheffield and Nottingham. 

Here is the list of the NHS Trusts which will roll-out the vaccines from December 8:

  • Blackpool Teaching Hospitals
  • Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals
  • Cambridge University Hospitals
  • Chesterfield Royal Hospital
  • Countess of Chester Hospital
  • Croydon University Hospital
  • Dartford and Gravesham Hospitals
  • Dorset County Hospitals
  • East and North Hertfordshire Hospitals
  • East Kent Hospitals
  • East Suffolk and North Essex Hospitals
  • Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust
  • Gloucestershire Hospitals
  • Great Western Hospitals
  • Guys & St Thomas NHS Trust
  • James Paget University Hospitals
  • Kings College Hospital
  • Princess Royal University Hospital, Kings
  • Lancashire Teaching Hospital
  • Leeds Teaching Hospital
  • Leicester Partnership NHS Trust
  • Liverpool University Hospitals
  • Medway NHS Foundation Trust
  • Mid and South Essex Hospitals
  • Milton Keynes University Hospital
  • Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital
  • Northampton General Hospital
  • North Bristol NHS Foundation Trust
  • North West Anglia Foundation Trust
  • Nottingham University Hospitals
  • Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust
  • Portsmouth Hospital University
  • Royal Cornwall Hospitals
  • Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust
  • Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust
  • Sheffield Teaching Hospitals
  • Sherwood Forest Hospitals
  • Shrewsbury and Telford NHS Trust
  • Stockport NHS Foundation Trust
  • St George's University Hospitals
  • The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals
  • University College Hospitals
  • University Hospitals Birmingham
  • University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire
  • University Hospitals Derby Burton
  • University Hospitals of North Midlands
  • University Hospitals Plymouth
  • United Lincolnshire Hospitals
  • Walsall Healthcare
  • West Hertfordshire Hospitals
  • Wirral University Teaching Hospital
  • Worcestershire Acute Hospitals
  • Yeovil District Hospital

Vaccines will also be rolled out from Tuesday in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, although a full list of the hospitals which will receive them is yet to be announced. 

Where else will the vaccinations take place?

Military personnel have been ordered to transform about ten sites into vaccine hubs, including the Nightingale hospital at the London ExCel Centre, Epsom racecourse, in Surrey, and Bristol’s Ashton Gate football stadium and Robertson House conference facility in Stevenage will serve the capital and south of England, according to sources.

Derby City Council leaders also confirmed the local authority is finalising arrangements for Derby Arena to be used as a vaccination centre.

Other locations being considered as possible venues include: The Black Country Living Museum, Millennium Point, parts of Malvern's Three Counties' Showground in Worcestershire and the Villa Park site, home of Aston Villa FC in the West Midlands, and Leicester racecourse in the East Midlands.

A mass rollout of Covid-19 vaccinations is also expected to start on December 9 in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire.

How will the temperature of Pfizer affect the vaccination programme?

The jab will be rolled out to GPs and pharmacists that can store the vaccine at the -70C it needs to stay effective.

In response to criticism that the temperature of the vaccine would make it difficult to be issued around care homes, Professor Van-Tam argued that it was “extremely unfair when one considers a new virus emerged less than 12 months ago and we now have our first vaccine”. 

The Deputy Chief Medical Officer continued: "This is a complex product. It is not a yoghurt that can be taken out of the fridge and put back in several times."

However, the Scottish Health Secretary announced that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine would be delivered to care home residents in Scotland before December 14.

Jeane Freeman said talks held on December 3 had confirmed the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine can be transported in an unfrozen state for up to 12 hours, and can also be broken down into smaller packs in "certain conditions".

Ms Freeman said this makes the vaccine "more useable with minimum wastage for care home residents and our older citizens".

The National Care Forum said the only viable solution for care home residents is to get the jabs "over the threshold".

A spokeswoman said: "It seems that the Scottish Government has come to a different conclusion and in fact intends to honour the prioritisation outlined by the JCVI and deliver the vaccine directly to Scottish care homes.

"It is not at all clear at this moment why the English Government is not pursuing this path."