Mauritius Sees Largest Rally in 40 Years Over Oil Spills

Mauritians took to the streets of Mahébourg for the second time in a month on Saturday in frustration over the perceived government mishandling of the devastating oil spills caused from the 1000-tonne fuel-carrying Japanese Wakashio — which was shipwrecked in the waters off the southeast coast of the island in July consequently putting the nation in a state of environmental emergency. A crowd of an estimated 25,000 flag-waving and face-painted demonstrators called for the resignation of Prime Minister Pravind Jugnauth and his government. This was the largest major rally that the island has seen in 40 years and the second in a month over the worst environmental crisis in the country’s history. Organisers of the priests claim that the number of participants is double what is being reported in the media. Many Mauritians demand that officials resolve the ecological disaster accordingly for the sake of future generations in a country whose economy relies heavily on these- now contaminated waters, for ecotourism and fishing. The spill has inflicted untold damage on the Indian Ocean archipelago of 1.3 million people.

Mauritius Sees Largest Rally in 40 Years Over Oil Spills

Mauritians took to the streets of Mahébourg for the second time in a month on Saturday in frustration over the perceived government mishandling of the devastating oil spills caused from the 1000-tonne fuel-carrying Japanese Wakashio — which was shipwrecked in the waters off the southeast coast of the island in July consequently putting the nation in a state of environmental emergency.

A crowd of an estimated 25,000 flag-waving and face-painted demonstrators called for the resignation of Prime Minister Pravind Jugnauth and his government.

This was the largest major rally that the island has seen in 40 years and the second in a month over the worst environmental crisis in the country’s history. Organisers of the priests claim that the number of participants is double what is being reported in the media.

Many Mauritians demand that officials resolve the ecological disaster accordingly for the sake of future generations in a country whose economy relies heavily on these- now contaminated waters, for ecotourism and fishing.

The spill has inflicted untold damage on the Indian Ocean archipelago of 1.3 million people.