Latest local lockdown rules for Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland is to enter a period of intensified coronavirus restrictions after the Stormont executive announced closures of schools, pubs and restaurants. Pubs and restaurants will close for four weeks, with the exception of takeaways and deliveries, while schools will close on Monday for two weeks, one of which will cover the half-term break. The measures do not amount to a full-scale lockdown similar to that imposed during the first wave of the virus, but they mark a significant ramping up of the administration's response to spiralling infection rates. First Minister Arlene Foster announced the restrictions at a special sitting of the Assembly on October 13. She said the rising Covid-19 figures in Northern Ireland were of "grave concern". "We fully appreciate that this will be difficult and worrying news for a lot of people," she told MLAs. "The executive has taken this decision because it is necessary, and we discussed the impacts in great detail. We do not take this step lightly." What are the new rules?  Retail outlets will remain open, as will gyms for individual training. Churches will also remain open. It is understood a 25-person limit will be placed on funerals and weddings, but wedding receptions are prohibited. People should work from home unless unable to do so, and are urged not to take unnecessary journeys. Indoor sporting activities are not allowed and outdoor contact sports will be limited to elite athletes. Off licences will be required to shut at 8pm. How are the restrictions enforced? The police will be able to take action against those who break these rules, including asking people to disperse and issuing £100 fixed penalty notices. For repeat offenders, these fines can increase up to £3,200. People aged 18 or over can be fined: £200 for the first offence, lowered to £100 if paid within 14 days £400 for the second offence, then doubling for each further offence up to a maximum of £6,400

Latest local lockdown rules for Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland is to enter a period of intensified coronavirus restrictions after the Stormont executive announced closures of schools, pubs and restaurants.

Pubs and restaurants will close for four weeks, with the exception of takeaways and deliveries, while schools will close on Monday for two weeks, one of which will cover the half-term break.

The measures do not amount to a full-scale lockdown similar to that imposed during the first wave of the virus, but they mark a significant ramping up of the administration's response to spiralling infection rates.

First Minister Arlene Foster announced the restrictions at a special sitting of the Assembly on October 13.

She said the rising Covid-19 figures in Northern Ireland were of "grave concern".

"We fully appreciate that this will be difficult and worrying news for a lot of people," she told MLAs.

"The executive has taken this decision because it is necessary, and we discussed the impacts in great detail. We do not take this step lightly."

What are the new rules? 

Retail outlets will remain open, as will gyms for individual training.

Churches will also remain open. It is understood a 25-person limit will be placed on funerals and weddings, but wedding receptions are prohibited.

People should work from home unless unable to do so, and are urged not to take unnecessary journeys.

Indoor sporting activities are not allowed and outdoor contact sports will be limited to elite athletes.

Off licences will be required to shut at 8pm.

How are the restrictions enforced?

The police will be able to take action against those who break these rules, including asking people to disperse and issuing £100 fixed penalty notices. For repeat offenders, these fines can increase up to £3,200.

People aged 18 or over can be fined:

£200 for the first offence, lowered to £100 if paid within 14 days £400 for the second offence, then doubling for each further offence up to a maximum of £6,400