How many Covid cases have there been in your area? Use our tool to find out

New cases of Covid-19 are continuing to fall across the UK, as lockdown and the vaccination rollout push down infections in the vast majority of local areas. Weekly case numbers are now over five times smaller than the figures seen at the peak of the second wave in January and have fallen to levels not seen in the UK since at least September 2020.  The fall in Covid deaths in England is currently running around three weeks ahead of modelling estimates, figures show, as experts called for lockdown to be eased more quickly. The most recent Scientific Pandemic Influenza Modelling group (SPI-M) projections were produced on Feb 10 and were pivotal in developing the Government's roadmap out of restrictions. The midpoint projections estimated that deaths in England would not fall below 200 a day until around mid-March – but that point was reached on Feb 25. With the spread of coronavirus increasingly under control, the Prime Minister announced a route out of lockdown on Feb 22, outlining the expected dates and aims to remove restrictions. It comes as the UK's Covid-19 alert level was lowered from alert level five to level four, as the country's top medics said the threat of the NHS being overwhelmed has receded. Most promisingly, as of Mar 14 over 24 million people have now received their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine, after the Government achieved its target of vaccinating the top four priority groups by mid-February. The JCVI announced on Feb 26 that aged between 40-49 will be the first to receive a vaccine invite in phase two of the vaccine rollout, which will begin once all people over 50 and those in the most vulnerable groups have been invited to get the jab. It comes as Mr Johnson said every person aged over 18 will have been offered a coronavirus vaccination by the end of July, raising hopes of foreign holidays and the return of outdoor events by August. Search for your area Public Health England release a daily update on how many confirmed cases of coronavirus there are in each local authority in the UK.  Type in your postcode in the tool below to find out how many cases there have been in your local area. How are cases spreading in the UK, and how are we trying to slow the spread? Only a small minority of places are seeing cases rise at the moment - in contrast to the situation at the end of December, where infections were surging across the entire UK.  Every single local authority area in England saw cases increase in the week up to Dec 31, but that figure is now closer to one in ten as of the end of February.  Shrinking infections nationally is reflected in a key metric called the R rate - a measure of how many people those infected with Covid-19 go on to infect on average.  An R rate of 1.2 means that every ten people infected with Covid-19 pass it on to twelve other people, while an R rate of 0.8 means they pass it on to only eight people.  When R is below one, as has been officially the case since Feb 12 in the UK, then the virus is no longer infecting enough people to be growing exponentially. It is estimated to be between 0.6 to 0.8 as of Mar 12. Lockdown has played in part in slowing the spread, with the R rate only last being this low in the wake of the first lockdown in March 2020, yet also helping push down infections could be the vaccination rollout.  The UK became the first western country to begin administering the coronavirus vaccine, and Government hopes that mass vaccination could help slow the infection rate, particularly among the vulnerable older generation. In total, 250 active hospital sites, 89 vaccination centres, and around 1,200 local vaccination sites - including primary care networks, community pharmacy sites and mobile teams – were set up to ensure every at-risk person has easy access to a vaccination centre, regardless of where they live. Some 100 Oxford million jabs have been ordered by the Government, with 40 million due to be rolled out by March. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency also approved the Moderna vaccine for use on Jan 8, which will be delivered in the spring. But what about the new strains?  Studies suggested the Oxford/Astrazeneca vaccine may be only 10 per cent effective against the South African strain, but Professor Jonathan Van Tam said the variant is not likely to become dominant. The news comes as scientists have found that the Kent coronavirus variant is mutating to mimic the South African variant, which could render current vaccines less effective. Surge testing in areas of Manchester, including Moss Side and Fallowfield, started from Feb 9 to combat the spread of the Kent variant, after four cases from two unconnected households were discovered. Door-to-door testing will take place for those who cannot attend testing centres, as well as offering tests to those who work in the area. There have also been 55 cases of a new lineage in Liverpool which appears to be a mutation of the very early 'A' st

How many Covid cases have there been in your area? Use our tool to find out

New cases of Covid-19 are continuing to fall across the UK, as lockdown and the vaccination rollout push down infections in the vast majority of local areas.

Weekly case numbers are now over five times smaller than the figures seen at the peak of the second wave in January and have fallen to levels not seen in the UK since at least September 2020. 

The fall in Covid deaths in England is currently running around three weeks ahead of modelling estimates, figures show, as experts called for lockdown to be eased more quickly.

The most recent Scientific Pandemic Influenza Modelling group (SPI-M) projections were produced on Feb 10 and were pivotal in developing the Government's roadmap out of restrictions.

The midpoint projections estimated that deaths in England would not fall below 200 a day until around mid-March – but that point was reached on Feb 25.

With the spread of coronavirus increasingly under control, the Prime Minister announced a route out of lockdown on Feb 22, outlining the expected dates and aims to remove restrictions.

It comes as the UK's Covid-19 alert level was lowered from alert level five to level four, as the country's top medics said the threat of the NHS being overwhelmed has receded.

Most promisingly, as of Mar 14 over 24 million people have now received their first dose of the coronavirus vaccine, after the Government achieved its target of vaccinating the top four priority groups by mid-February.

The JCVI announced on Feb 26 that aged between 40-49 will be the first to receive a vaccine invite in phase two of the vaccine rollout, which will begin once all people over 50 and those in the most vulnerable groups have been invited to get the jab.

It comes as Mr Johnson said every person aged over 18 will have been offered a coronavirus vaccination by the end of July, raising hopes of foreign holidays and the return of outdoor events by August.

Search for your area

Public Health England release a daily update on how many confirmed cases of coronavirus there are in each local authority in the UK. 

Type in your postcode in the tool below to find out how many cases there have been in your local area.

How are cases spreading in the UK, and how are we trying to slow the spread?

Only a small minority of places are seeing cases rise at the moment - in contrast to the situation at the end of December, where infections were surging across the entire UK. 

Every single local authority area in England saw cases increase in the week up to Dec 31, but that figure is now closer to one in ten as of the end of February. 

Shrinking infections nationally is reflected in a key metric called the R rate - a measure of how many people those infected with Covid-19 go on to infect on average. 

An R rate of 1.2 means that every ten people infected with Covid-19 pass it on to twelve other people, while an R rate of 0.8 means they pass it on to only eight people. 

When R is below one, as has been officially the case since Feb 12 in the UK, then the virus is no longer infecting enough people to be growing exponentially. It is estimated to be between 0.6 to 0.8 as of Mar 12.

Lockdown has played in part in slowing the spread, with the R rate only last being this low in the wake of the first lockdown in March 2020, yet also helping push down infections could be the vaccination rollout. 

The UK became the first western country to begin administering the coronavirus vaccine, and Government hopes that mass vaccination could help slow the infection rate, particularly among the vulnerable older generation.

In total, 250 active hospital sites, 89 vaccination centres, and around 1,200 local vaccination sites - including primary care networks, community pharmacy sites and mobile teams – were set up to ensure every at-risk person has easy access to a vaccination centre, regardless of where they live.

Some 100 Oxford million jabs have been ordered by the Government, with 40 million due to be rolled out by March. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency also approved the Moderna vaccine for use on Jan 8, which will be delivered in the spring.

But what about the new strains? 

Studies suggested the Oxford/Astrazeneca vaccine may be only 10 per cent effective against the South African strain, but Professor Jonathan Van Tam said the variant is not likely to become dominant.

The news comes as scientists have found that the Kent coronavirus variant is mutating to mimic the South African variant, which could render current vaccines less effective.

Surge testing in areas of Manchester, including Moss Side and Fallowfield, started from Feb 9 to combat the spread of the Kent variant, after four cases from two unconnected households were discovered. Door-to-door testing will take place for those who cannot attend testing centres, as well as offering tests to those who work in the area.

There have also been 55 cases of a new lineage in Liverpool which appears to be a mutation of the very early 'A' strain of the virus, which now carries E484K as well as other changes that could make it more transmissible. It has been designated as a "variant under investigation".

However, Nick Loman, professor of microbial genomics and bioinformatics at the University of Birmingham, said it was unlikely that the new variants could out-compete the less dangerous UK variant.

Additionally, a new variant from the Philippines has also been identified in England for the first time after two case were reported on Mar 16. It came after the Philippines reported 33 cases of a new variant on Mar 9.

Public Health England said the variant contains a number of notable mutations, including the E484K spike protein found in the Manaus variant. Concerns have been raised that vaccines may not be as effective against this protein.

The new strain has been designated as a variant under investigation (VUI) rather than a variant of concern, such as the Manaus strain.

Public Health England said one of the cases was linked to international travel and the other is still being investigated, but did not confirm where either had been found. 

How did coronavirus spread worldwide?

At the end of Dec 2019, the Chinese authorities sent out a public alert warning that a “pneumonia of unknown cause” had been identified in Wuhan, central China.

Some 10 days later, on Jan 7, scientists announced that a new coronavirus was the source of the outbreak – quickly adding that it then did not appear to be spreading between humans. 

At that point, fewer than 60 cases had been found. But now the virus, since given the name SARS-CoV-2, has spread to 185 countries, infecting more than 118.5 million people with the disease Covid-19 and killing more than 2.6 million.

This map, which updates automatically, shows where the disease is now, how many cases there have been and how many people have died: